Premature Music Scores

Movie-making is a serious business, which costs a lot of money. This trade involves a great many artists and specialists, who, as a rule, meticulously produce these works of art. But, sometimes even excellent films lack historical accuracy. Below are examples of historical flicks, where background music, intended to demonstrate harmonious sounds of an epoch, was actually taken from later periods.

A Nazi drama film “Der große König” (The Great King, directed by Veit Harlan, produced by Tobis Filmkunst, 1942) lavishly depicts the life of  Frederick the Great (1712-1786) – a king of Prussia. However, the Russian anthem “Боже, храни Царя!” (God Save the Tsar!), which has been performed at a ceremonial dinner in this movie, was actually adopted only in 1833.  German-Russian TV Mini-series “Под знаком Скорпиона” (Under the Sign of the Scorpio, directed by Yuri Sorokin, produced by Gorky Film Studios, 1995) has untimely used as background music in its final installment, set in 1930s, a military march “На страже мира” (On Guard for Peace), which was composed by Boris Diev in 1966. A spy epic The Good Shepherd (directed by Robert De Niro, produced by Universal Pictures, 2006) has its plot-line ended in 1961. But, in a tragic scene, most likely set in the late 1950s, a Soviet defector sings a song “Пусть всегда будет солнце” (May There Always Be Sunshine) by Arkady Ostrovsky, which was released in July, 1962.

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